Healing

Healing

Helpful articles to help you understand the addiction, what your loved one is going through, and how to heal yourself.

  The process in which a loved one would make amends is a delicate one, at best.  There are no proper words that could fit accurately enough to describe what it’s like when they are finally coming to you, willing to admit their wrongdoings, and ready to proclaim their plan of action to make them up to you.  As overwhelming as it may seem, amends can additionally be equally as relieving as long as you remember that certain factors like time can ease the hardship of the process. What It Means To Make Amends Before When your loved one approaches…
Families are often the primary support for people who have substance abuse problems. Families are likely to experience significant physical, emotional, social, and spiritual stress. Family members can be profoundly affected by having an ill family member; however, quite often they also show a strong desire to understand addiction and mental health problems, and have a high level of motivation to be part of the process of recovery. Families need an opportunity to tell their own stories and know that they are not alone, which is why their own recovery is important. It can be more difficult to experience the…
Do you feel trapped, or emotionally abused by your loved one? Do you feel isolated from family and friends, afraid to let anyone know what is happening? In a situation like this, the worst thing you can do is to keep silent. It is not helping your loved one, your family, or yourself, to suffer in silence. AA has a saying, "You're as sick as your secrets," and it is so true. Don't keep the secret any longer. Find someone you can trust to confide in - be it a friend or other family members who may have noticed the…
In this new generation of internet marketing and social media, there are many constructive web sites that can help someone that struggles with the disease of anorexia or bulimia. Those are the sites that encourage someone that is afflicted with these rapidly growing disorders to get the necessary help one would need to live a happy life in recovery. About one in every ten Americans suffers from an eating disorder of some kind; and one out of every four to five are teenagers. These numbers are astonishing, but what are even more outrageous, are the web sites that encourage such…
When you have little to no boundaries, you compromise who you are. You can lose your identity, your freedom, your life, and even the ability to see right from wrong. Since you are the only one over which you have control, healthy boundaries are a necessary part of spiritual growth and self-love. If the addict or alcoholic in your life is your child, don’t fall into the trap of trying to rescue them as they walk all over you and your life - set boundaries. If it is another family member that is engulfed in the disease of addiction, do…
An Appeal and an Encouragement to Families of Addicts and Alcoholics “We women carry with us a picture of the ideal man, the sort of chap we would like our husbands to be.” I read that sentence in the Alcoholics Anonymous book in the chapter dedicated to wives of alcoholics, and realized that such a picture is carried by anyone close to an alcoholic, particularly those who knew them long before their first drink. I have a brother who still suffers under addiction. My picture of him shows the brother with whom I would still work out, play games, and…
Often in addiction treatment circles, we hear that addiction is a family disease, affecting not just the addict, but also all those around the addict. Stories of the family addiction can best be told by those who have watched in horror as a loved one spirals out of control in addiction. Addiction itself is a very complicated disease, and many organizations and groups have been set up in order to assist family members, such as Al-Anon for loved ones of alcoholics, and Nar-Anon for loved ones of drug addicts. Just as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous serve as a strong…
Addiction is a chronic disease; life-long recovery requires continued care for the loved one with the addiction problems, as well as for the family, also wishing to recover from the effects of alcoholism on the family structure. Most likely, in the course of your loved one’s treatment, you may have been involved in speaking to your loved one’s therapist or another member on their treatment team in order to share information. Those actions may have been helpful in developing a treatment plan as well as an aftercare plan. The continuing care plan focuses on how the patient can integrate recovery…
Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS) and the Recovery Process There are two stages of withdrawal from alcohol and drugs and they are known as acute and post-acute withdrawal syndrome.  The acute withdrawal phase deals with the physical symptoms of detox, whereas the post-acute withdrawal deals primarily with the emotional and mental symptoms that come after the acute phase is completed. It is not uncommon for an addict or alcoholic to suffer from post-acute withdrawal syndrome anywhere from six months up to two years after last use. Long-term drug abuse and alcoholism can damage the nervous system and this helps produce the…
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