Acceptance

Acceptance

When we find acceptance, we find peace and serenity. Here are some helpful suggestions to help you gain true peace through acceptance in your life.

Defining Codependency Codependency is an excessive psychological or emotional dependence on a person. Typically a codependent person attaches themselves to those suffering from an illness, whether it is emotional, mental, or physical. Many times codependency, or codependent, is used to describe someone who is dealing with a person who suffers from drug addiction and/or alcoholism. More Information as it relates to codependency? Dysfunctional Family Roles: Growing Up With Addiction Are You In Love Or Lust? Defining Codependency Am I Codependent? Understanding Codependency: What is Codependency? Codependents usually display patterns that can be quickly identified if the person is being honest…
Growing Up in a Dysfunctional Home:  Children and Addiction Children who grow up in an addicted home suffer just as much, if not worse than the addict or alcoholic.  Dysfunctional homes can take a toll on a child’s emotional, physical and cognitive development.  When addiction is present in a home, children take on different roles to compensate for the lack of guidance from the addicted parent.  These different roles lead to long term emotional problems, and studies show that children that grow up in addicted homes are more likely to develop substance abuse problems themselves.  Depending on the child’s method…
Certain roles are often present in any family, but when drug addiction is added to the mix these roles become considerably prevalent.  The entire family is in a sense, “spiritually sick.”  Identifying these roles is the first step in the healing process.  Let’s look at each specific role.    The Addict This is the family member with the addiction.  Everything is centered on and revolves around this person.  Other family members take on different roles around this person.  They pick up whatever duties and responsibilities the addict is lacking.  However, the addict does not have to be the most important person…
“The alcoholic is like a tornado roaring his way through the lives of others.  Hearts are broken.  Sweet relationships are dead.  Affections have been uprooted.  Selfish and inconsiderate habits have kept the home in turmoil.” (Alcoholics Anonymous p. 82) Addicts and alcoholics leave their families in a state of constant chaos and fear.  Selfishness, dishonesty and anger are commonplace in addicted homes.  The addict’s behavior creates negative emotions, which in turn causes family members to become more and more intoxicated by these conflicting feelings.  Like the addict, family members become “spiritually sick,” and they are usually in more pain than…
Page 2 of 2